Male Doll: Hat

1913.07.0019C

Object Image

    Basic Information

    Artifact Identification Male Doll: Hat   (1913.07.0019C)
    Classification/
    Nomenclature
    1. Communication Artifacts
    2. :
    3. Documentary Artifacts
    4. :
    5. Other Documents
    Artist/Maker None
    Geographic Location
    Period/Date Late-19th century – Early-20th century
    Culture German

    Physical Analysis

    Dimension 1 (Width) 10.7 cm
    Dimension 2 (Depth) 10.2 cm
    Dimension 3 (Height) 5.8 cm
    Weight 12 g
    Measuring Remarks Width measured at downturned edges of hat (side-to-side on doll). Depth measured at upturned edges of hat (front-to-back on doll, with hat band tails to the back of the doll's head).
    Materials Paper, Textile--Satin, Textile--Wool, Plant--Balsa
    Manufacturing Processes Textile--Hand Sewn
    Munsell Color Information N/A

    Research Remarks

    Published Description

    Facebook Post 094, scheduled for 12/23/2016 and/or 2010 magazine: The Miniature Mannequins of Volkskunsthaus Wallach by James Sinclair and Beth Watkins One of the Spurlock's significant collections of European cultural artifacts is a group of over 200 pieces created or collected by Julius Wallach, a German-Jewish expert on traditional European folk arts and textiles. Among these are a group of 59 miniature mannequins dressed in small-scale replicas of traditional European clothing. In 1900, Julius Wallach and his brother Moritz, who had developed an interest in European folk cultures and arts as teenagers, started a small store in Munich to make and sell traditional costumes for theatrical and musical performances and costume balls. The Wallachs' work was well-respected, and they were involved in some prominent projects, such as a Prussian royal commission for a dirndl gown and creating a variety of period costumes for Munich's Octoberfest in 1911. The brothers also ran a textile factory and opened a gallery, the Volkskunsthaus, for collecting and selling folk art. The Wallachs soon realized that the traditional clothing from Europe was disappearing from the local communities and decided to preserve some varieties in miniature form. They collected original fabric designs from multiple countries and created authentic miniature versions of dozens of outfits. Research does not confirm whether more of these dolls were created than are in the Spurlock's holdings. Ours were purchased from the Volkskunsthaus by the University's Museum of European Culture in 1913. These dolls, each no more than 18 inches high, exhibit women's and men's clothing from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Spurlock Museum also holds some textile fragments and a few life-size items created by the Wallachs, including Hungarian wedding ensembles, complete with hats and boots. In the 1930s, the Wallachs had to flee Germany and were forced to sell their store to "Aryan" buyers, but their efforts to preserve folk culture are still recognized. Much of their collection was confiscated by the Nazis—and, according to one newspaper story, there is a photograph of Adolph Hitler in a room with curtains made by the Wallachs—and later found by Allied forces, who returned the still-packed trunks of looted materials to the Wallach family. The Jewish Museum of Munich recently displayed some of these artifacts, on loan from descendants around the world, in an exhibit called Dirndls, Trunks, and Edelweiss: The Folk Art of the Wallach Brothers. Today, the Wallach store maintains its reputation as a center of traditional Bavarian clothing and handicrafts. References: Spurlock Museum artifact files "Dirndls, Trunks, and Edelweiss: The Folk Art of the Wallach Brothers: an exhibition at the Jewish Museum in Munich, June 27–December 30, 2007" HaGalil.com (accessed May 25, 2010). Jewish Museum of Munich website description of Dirndls, Trunks, and Edelweiss exhibit (accessed May 25, 2010). Julius Wallach Imprint Collection description, Millersville University Special Collections and Archives website (accessed May 24, 2010). Melinda Green, "Wallach family descendants join celebration of German heritage," The New Standard (Independence, Ohio) June 10, 2007 (online version accessed May 24, 2010). New York Times online travel guides: Munich (accessed May 25, 2010). [images] Choose pairs from 1913.07.0005/6, .0011/12, .0015/16, .0029/30, .0035/36, .0051/52 [all end with X_.psd]

    Description N/A
    Comparanda N/A
    Bibliography

    Bridgewater, William, and Seymour Kurtz, eds. The Columbia Encyclopedia. 3rd ed. New York & London: Columbia University Press, 1963, p. 2382. "Dirndls, Trunks, and Edelweiss: The Folk Art of the Wallach Brothers: an exhibition at the Jewish Museum in Munich, June 27–December 30, 2007" HaGalil.com (accessed May 25, 2010). Jewish Museum of Munich website description of Dirndls, Trunks, and Edelweiss exhibit (accessed May 25, 2010). Julius Wallach Imprint Collection description, Millersville University Special Collections and Archives website (accessed May 24, 2010). Melinda Green, "Wallach family descendants join celebration of German heritage," The New Standard (Independence, Ohio) June 10, 2007 (online version accessed May 24, 2010). New York Times online travel guides: Munich (accessed May 25, 2010).

    Artifact History

    Archaeological Data N/A
    Credit Line/Dedication Purchase
    Reproduction no
    Reproduction Information N/A

    Share What You Know!

    The Spurlock Museum actively seeks opportunities to improve what we know and record about our collections. If you have knowledge about this object, please get in touch with our Registration staff by using the form below. Please note that we cannot give appraisals, provide any information related to value, or authenticate artifacts.

    Please enter your first name.
    Please enter your last name.
    Please enter a valid email address.
    Please enter comments you would like to share about the artifact.

    All fields are required.