Figure: Li Bai

2016.14.0003A

Thumbnail of Figure: Li Bai ()

Detailed Images

Basic Information

Artifact Identification Figure: Li Bai   (2016.14.0003A)
Classification/
Nomenclature
  1. Communication Artifacts
  2. :
  3. Art
  4. :
  5. N/A
Artist/Maker None
Geographic Location
Period/Date Qing Dynasty, 18th century
Culture N/A

Physical Analysis

Dimension 1 (Height) 11.05 cm
Dimension 2 (Length) 8.48 cm
Dimension 3 (Width) 8.11 cm
Weight 253 g
Measuring Remarks None
Materials Plant--Wood
Manufacturing Processes Carved
Munsell Color Information N/A

Research Remarks

Published Description N/A
Description

Chinese fir/cedar wood carvings of figures are rare and wood carvings of Li Bai are scarce, thus this is a rare and scarce finely carved Chinese fir/cedar wood seated Li Bai with jug alongside, 5 3/4” high with stand, 18th century. The figure wearing an open robe is pegged into a root wood stand. Li Bai was born 701 A. D. and died 762 A.D. The second most important Chinese poet of the Tang Dynasty, Li Bai (also known as Li Po, Li Pai, Li T’ai-po, and Lie T’ai-pai) was probably born in central Asia and grew up in Sichuan Province. He left home in 725 to wander through the Yangtze River Valley and write poetry. In 742 he was appointed to the Hanlin Academy by Emperor Zuanzong, though he was eventually expelled from court. He then served the Prince of Yun, who led a revolt after the An Lushan Rebellion of 755. Li Bai was arrested for treason; after he was pardoned, he again wandered the Yangtze Valley. He was married four times and was friends with the poet Du Fu (the #1 Poet in China with Li Bai the #2 poet in China).
Li Po wrote occasional verse and poems about his own life. His poetry is known for its clear imagery and conversational tone. His work influenced a number of 20th century poets, including Ezra Pound and James Wright. Li Bai was also one of the most famous wine drinkers in China’s long tradition of imbibers, and is depicted in decorative arts showing his joy of drinking. He is also known for his numerous writings including the subjects of friendship, solitude, the passage of time and the joys of nature, with brilliance and great freshness of imagination.
Chinese cedar also called fir wood (Cunninghamia lancelota), Nanmu in Chinese, is beautiful, light, soft, resinous, and durable, even when in contact with soil or moistures. Nanmu comes from a family of trees having aromatic, often red or red-tinged wood that in many cases is decay-resistant and insect-repellent. Nanmu has a small knot structure which is sound and tight and fragrant, was often painted and/or lacquered. - Bernie McManus, Appraiser, Woodbury House, 7/21/2016

Comparanda

Lot #2344: A RARE AND FINELY CARVED BAMBOO FIGURE OF GUANDI. Late Ming Dynasty, 17th century. Christie’s Hong Kong. Sale #2625, A Fine Collection of Chinese Bamboo Carvings from the Personal Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Gerard Hawthorn. December 3, 2008. Lot #2342: A BAMBOO CARVING OF SHOULAO. Qing Dynasty, 18th century. Christie’s Hong Kong. Sale #2625, A Fine Collection of Chinese Bamboo Carvings from the Personal Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Gerard Hawthorn. December 3, 2008. lot #2320: A WELL-CARVED BAMBOO FIGURE OF DONGFANG SHUO. Late Ming Dynasty, 17th century. Christie’s Hong Kong. Sale #2625, A Fine Collection of Chinese Bamboo Carvings from the Personal Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Gerard Hawthorn. December 3, 2008.

Bibliography N/A

Artifact History

Archaeological Data N/A
Credit Line/Dedication Fred A. Freund Collection
Reproduction No
Reproduction Information N/A

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